Implement an effective employee wellness program with these 9 tips

A wellness program not only benefits your employees physically and emotionally, it can also make them more productive workers and improve your retention rates.

As the owner of a small business, you may not think that an employee wellness program is necessary for your small team. However, by promoting wellness in the workplace, you are supporting your employees and helping to boost their moral and motivation. 

The pandemic brought the great exodus from the workplace and with it, new challenges in finding and keeping good employees. The cost to your business when you have to keep replacing and training new employees is huge, so it is crucial for your business to prioritize wellness and to support your employees. 

There are many ways in which to go about doing this. This article outlines some tips for creating a successful wellness program that supports employees and helps maintain a strong workplace. 

Here are some suggestions that you may want to implement in your workplace:

Workplace wellness tip no. 1: Listen to your employees’ needs. Talk to them and survey them. This will help you to design a wellness program that they would like to participate in. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 2: Create a healthy work environment. This goes a long way toward boosting productivity. Encourage employees to exercise, listen to music, take a walk, and to get moving during their break periods. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 3: Blend wellness into your company culture. Offer a nice breakroom or even put in an exercise room. This will allow your employees a space to de-stress. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 4: Promote wellness education. A healthy lifestyle will help to keep sick days to a minimum. Some ways to promote this include offering online classes on topics like nutrition and disease prevention, the importance of exercise and of not smoking. Your health insurance provider may be able to help with this as they often offer online classes, etc.

Workplace wellness tip no. 5: Make sure you participate. Don’t just talk the talk. Your participation will set a good example and encourage others to follow.

Workplace wellness tip no. 6: Have fun! Consider hosting a challenge to boost interaction around your new wellness program. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 7: Set common goals. This will help to foster communication and participation. Set up a goals chart and reward employees for participating. These can be virtual events or in-person events. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 8: Encourage wellness through check-ups. Offer medical screenings and stock the break room with healthy snacks and drinks.

Workplace wellness tip no. 9: Go mobile! Encourage employees to use mobile apps to monitor and track fitness goals. 

Workplace wellness tip no. 10: Incorporate volunteering into your program. Many volunteer opportunities incorporate physical activity, such as working in a community garden or building houses for those in need. 

These are just suggestions, but studies have shown employee wellness can be motivated by workplace programs. Try incorporating all or just a few of these suggestions and see how it can positively affect your employees and your bottom line.

President, SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Speaker, Trainer, Corporate Security Expert Timothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

 
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  • Next up: The importance of building customer loyalty
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  • The importance of building customer loyalty

    Customer loyalty is one of the many crucial elements to success for a small business. Check out these ways to earn repeat business and develop and build customer loyalty.

     

    I’ve written quite a bit lately about retaining employees, but today I want to discuss the importance of building customer loyalty. It’s crucial for every business to build customer loyalty, no matter if it is a retail, manufacturing or a service business. The hard fact is that if you don’t have returning customers, your business will not survive. Studies have shown that returning customers spend around 65-70% more money on products when compared to first-time customers. And customer loyalty helps to bring in new customers through recommendations. 

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    >> RELATED: Good customer service is critical for small business success

    In addition to the importance of understanding customer loyalty, there are many steps you can take to help develop and build customer loyalty including:

    Improve your customer experience. This is important whether their interaction with your business has been positive or negative. Tips for this include getting to know your customers by learning their names and their buying habits. Take the time to go above and beyond for your customers, pay attention and identify any areas you can improve on to keep their experience positive.

    Create a customer loyalty program. A customer loyalty program both encourages and rewards loyal customers. This can be as simple as rewards or discounts based on purchasing such as a bonus program, points program, spending program where the rewards increase with the amount spent, VIP rewards program offering special perks for joining, etc. While many of these may seem structured for retail, they can be modified for other types of businesses.

    Communicate with your customers. Frequent communication thru newsletters, emails, social media posts, phone calls, webchats, etc. is an inexpensive and highly effective way to build customer loyalty and improve on your customers’ experience. Develop what works best for your business and your customers.

    >> RELATED: Read more by Tim Dimoff

    Ask for feedback. A great way to improve and retain customer loyalty is by seeking out customer feedback. This can include surveys or asking questions on phone calls. The point here is to engage with your customers.

    Be sensitive to your customers financial needs and restrictions. Consider offering payment options. This can include 30 days with no finance charges, taking credit cards or PayPal, a down payment program with financing, etc. 

    Be mindful of how you come across in your communications. This includes written as well as verbal communications. Make sure your employees are always aware of their voice and tone—and that they use proper and respectful language. 

    Give customers a reason to be loyal. You can accomplish this by making their experience positive in every way—from their initial contact thru the final sale. The interaction you offer can define whether you develop customer loyalty or become a one-and-done. 

    The current business climate is highly and globally competitive. Ensuring a positive experience for your customers creates and strengthens your customer loyalty, which in turn creates a successful and profitable business for you.

    Timothy A. Dimoff, CPP, president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc., is a speaker, trainer and author and a leading authority in high-risk workplace and human resource security and crime issues. He is a Certified Protection Professional; a certified legal expert in corporate security procedures and training; a member of the Ohio and International Narcotic Associations; the Ohio and National Societies for Human Resource Managers; and the American Society for Industrial Security. He holds a B.S. in Sociology, with an emphasis in criminology, from Dennison University. Contact him at info@sacsconsulting.com.

     

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  • Next up: Ask SCORE: Three Basic Financial Documents For Business
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  • Ask SCORE: Three Basic Financial Documents For Business

    In order to properly manage your business operation and develop ongoing strategies for growth, businesses need to have complete and accurate financial data. Making time to manage financial reporting, however, can be cumbersome for many small business owners. There are three financial documents, however, that should not be ignored: the balance sheet, the Profit & Loss statement (P&L) and the cash flow statement.

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      Balance Sheet

    The balance sheet is a point in time statement which details assets, liabilities and capital (owner equity) of the business.  It provides detailed information on assets and expenditures over the preceding fiscal period.   While Cash is considered the most important number, other information regarding accounts receivable, owned property and major liabilities are also critical. The balance sheet elements together provide the net worth of the company. 

    Profit and Loss Statement

    The profit and loss statement, or P&L, is the income statement. It summarizes the business’ revenues and expenses during a specific period – usually by fiscal quarter and year. Specifically, the income statement provides information on:

    Sales & Revenue – money taken in

    Cost of Goods sold - money spent up front by the business in supplies and/or labor. In other words, the cost to provide the product/service

    Gross Profit – money made after accounting for the cost of goods sold

    Expenses - details on the money spent to operate the business.

    Utilizing this information, the business can calculate critical information on gross profit margins, operating profit margins and net profit margins

    Cash Flow Statement

    Through analysis of cash flow documents, the business can monitor how changes in balance sheet accounts and income affect cash. The cash flow statement breaks the information down into three categories: Operating Activities which are those that generate income, Investing activities which are purchases or disposal of assets such as plant and equipment, and Financing activities which represent loan repayments or borrowings. In order to be a useful resource in managing the business, this statement is typically generated on a monthly basis. It acts as a bridge between the balance sheet and income statement as it shows how money moves in and out of the business. Additionally, cash flow documents are helpful when assessing performance trends and other aspects of your business that wouldn’t be as evident if you were evaluating your business only based on the balance sheet or P&L.

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    A SCORE mentor can assist you through the process of setting up and maintaining your business’ balance sheet, P&L and cash flow statements.  Contact SCORE to obtain more information on this and other pertinent business topics as well as to request mentoring assistance.


    Content courtesy of
    SCORE

    Since 1964, SCORE “Mentors to America’s Small Business” has helped more than 11 million aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners through mentoring and business workshops. More than 10,000 volunteer business mentors in over 250 chapters serve their communities through entrepreneur education dedicated to the formation, growth and success of small businesses. For more information about starting or operating a small business, call 1-800-634-0245 for the SCORE chapter nearest you. Visit SCORE at www.score.org.

    Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions, and/or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA.

     



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